The Yankees called up lefty reliever Chasen Shreve before Tuesday night’s win over the Tigers

Chasen Shreve pitching during spring training.

Chasen Shreve pitching during spring training.

The Yankees beat the Detroit Tigers, 5-2, on Tuesday for their fourth win in five games. They are playing much better in their previous five games since they have been getting improved defensive play, reliable starting pitching and more offensive production.

Nathan Eovaldi had by far his best start as a Yankees and picked up his first win since August 8 of last season. He had four strikeouts and was able to get through seven innings while only throwing 94 pitches. That is a big improvement on his first two starts as he only threw 5.1 and 5.0 innings, respectively.

The Tigers were 0-6 with runners in scoring position while Shreve was pitching and he was able to get Detroit to hit into four double plays. Dellin Betances came into the game after Shreve allowed a double Alex Avila to leadoff the eighth, and he continued to pitch well retiring all three batters he faced including two strikeouts.

On offense, Chris Young continued to be much more valuable than Carlos Beltran as he was 3-3 to raise his average to .344 and hit his fourth homer of the season in the seventh inning. (Beltran has zero homers and a low .171 average.) Later in the seventh inning, Stephen Drew also hit his fourth homer of the season (he only has two hits besides those four homers) and Jacoby Ellsbury scored on a wild pitch by Al Alburquerque.

The Yankees scored their first run of the game on a Mark Teixeira double to deep right that sent Brett Gardner home. Teixeria is now tied for the team lead with four doubles and his 10 RBIs are second on the team to Alex Rodriguez’s 11.

**************************************************************************************************************************************************

Chasen Shreve, who was sent down to Triple-A Scranton because he threw 3.1 innings and 56 pitches in the 19-inning loss to the Red Sox on April 10, was called back up to the Yankees on Tuesday and Brandon Pinder was sent down. Shreve allowed one run in his first appearance on April 6, but he rebounded to perform extremely well against the Red Sox as he recorded four strikeouts and only three hits while pitching in extra innings.

In Shreve’s week an a half with the RailRiders he did not allow a run in his 2.1 innings of relief. The 24-year-old from Las Vegas allowed four hits in the only game he appeared in but he was able to pitch well with runners on base since he didn’t allow a run to score. That is a positive sign since he will likely often be brought into games in the middle of innings.

Shreve is a pitcher that the Yankees can rely on in middle relief this season. After Shreve made an adjustment to increase his velocity early last season he was able to dominate like he had not the previous season.

Just decided to throw harder and stop worrying about trying to not walk people instead of throwing quality strikes,” he said. “It was more of my choice to throw harder instead of trying to spot everything.”

In 2013, at two levels of the minors in the Braves organization, he had a 3.90 ERA in 62.1 innings. He was a fringe prospect at that point. However, in 2014, while pitching 54.1 innings at Double-A and briefly at Triple-A, Shreve had a 2.67 ERA in 64 innings with an impressive 87 strikeouts and only 12 walks. He was promoted to the Braves on September 1 after also getting a call up for five games in July, and only allowed a run in one game leading to an outstanding 0.73 ERA.

He will be a pitcher that the Joe Girardi can count in to pitch the sixth, seventh or eighth innings along with Dellin Betances, David Carpenter and Justin Wilson. Andrew Miller has won the closer job for now.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s